Tag Archives: transcription

LSC874—DC|THATCamp|2014

WHEEE! THATcamp is always my favorite event of the year. Next time I’ll get enough rest ahead of time so I don’t feel like I just worked a double shift while fighting off zombies during the holidays in retail. I slept for thirteen hours on Saturday night, so… yeah.

This THATcamp was put on by a GWU history class as part of their final project! The group was largely beginner to intermediate, by our own admission, and most of the sessions throughout the day focused on group discussion and shared experiences rather than workshops or panel discussions.

After a brief discussion and some Dork Shorts, the following schedule was decided:

THATcamp DC2014 Schedule

I attended Sunlight Data Visualization, mostly because I was really curious about using government data for educational reasons and how data visualizations use design to portray a message. The session was intense and enjoyable. I have stickers. They have some fantastic tools available on their website, including a Shazam-like app called Ad Hawk which will tell you more about the funding partners for ad campaigns. They also have a collection of deleted tweets from political figures, which is less educational and far more entertaining.

The second session I sat in on was “You have built it, they have come—NOW what?” which was hosted by Meghan Ferriter (@meghaninmotion) and the rest of the Smithsonian Transcription Center (STC) team. Everyone in the room discussed projects  with transcription or active ways to involve a community and build trust with users. The STC team shared their experience with launching their transcription center and things which surprised them—which was mostly how amazing the volunteer community was. They found that once people started transcribing, others actively reviewed the transcriptions and would often have contributions or revisions. The volunteers built on each others’ work and the regulars collaborated together, resulting in high quality transcriptions and an active community.

The third session was one that I imagine our class would have had a ball with: DH in the Classroom/Digital Pedagogy. The discussion centered around what kind of involvement in the online sphere was best suited for what kinds of assignments and students, from K-12 to Ph.Ds. My favorite bit that came out of the discussion was from the visual notetaker:

Blackboard is not a real world skill —> WordPress is used

 

The main takeaway I got was that our class is pretty fantastic, and that by using our WordPress blogs we are in fact practicing for having our work under public scrutiny by our peers, employers, and other scholars. In fact we’ve gone beyond practicing and are already doing it. So, go us!

Also, I met the fantastic Kathy Larsen, who teaches a class involving fanworks in media ranging from fanfic to Twitter accounts which impersonate West Wing characters. I have a lot of enthusiasm for this discussion because everyone was so interested and passionate and willing to share their experiences as well as learn from others. The woman who lead this discussion was at last year’s RailsGirlsDC event, and it really felt great to see her again and hear her speak about her experiences in digital pedagogy.

Finally, I decided to go to a low-key session about born-digital collections lead by Trevor Owens. I always enjoy his lead discussions because I always walk away with at least ten interesting links to look at in depth and a renewed interest in digital archives. It felt great to put my feet up and discuss video games, selfies, Yelp! reviews, and Geocities & fanfic archives, and hypertext literature with others. It really made me wonder if CUA could start gathering tweets & pics from campus events as part of a preservation effort. The Tower already includes some top tweets every week, it shouldn’t be too hard to begin gathering material. It might even be a good partnership project between the student newspaper and the library to find and share interest tweets.

Overall it was a fantastic day and I miss it already. Kelly joined me for the first half, and I’m so glad she did—the only other grad students who were there were in the humanities, and it was great to have another LIS peep there.

 

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